1. Introduction

1.3 Approach

Most of the literature reviewed was identified and provided by the MOE library. In addition, a significant proportion of supplementary literature was provided by an advisory member to the project.

“Listening to the learner voice can have important implications for producing positive outcomes related to approaches to learning, quality improvements and sustainable organisational change.” (Tahau-Hodges, 2010, p.58)

The literature was read, analysed and re-read to elicit key emergent themes. Significant weight was given to literature articulating Māori learner experiences from the perspective of Māori learners themselves and from the perspective of tertiary education providers. This was identified as an important focus, particularly as:

listening to the learner voice can have important implications for producing positive outcomes related to approaches to learning, quality improvements and sustainable organisational change (Tahau-Hodges, 2010, p.58).

Little focus was given to literature that was purely theoretical or ideological and not based on actual Māori learner experiences within tertiary settings.

Because the literature is largely focused on qualitative research and learner and provider experiences of what works or does not work for Māori learners in tertiary settings, commonly the research is not linked to quantitative data sets pertaining to completion, retention or progression statistics.

Rather, the synthesis and cross-analysis of the multiple studies reviewed has revealed a robust body of information that identifies key themes strongly and consistently present.